Center for Alaska Native Health Research
Institute of Arctic Biology
205 Arctic Health Research Building

 

Phone: 907-474-5528

1-888-470-5576 toll-free within Alaska 

Fax: 907-474-5700

uaf-iab-canhr@alaska.edu

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Cuqyun

Cuqyun (Yup’ik term for ‘a measuring tool’) is a developmental project linked with the long term, programmatic PA research.

Developing Indigenous Research Methodologies in the Arctic: Examining the Impacts of Settlement on Socialization and Youth Experience in Alaska and Siberia

This study explores the research methods and practices of two indigenous anthropologists working with indigenous youth and communities on issues related to social change and wellbeing in the circumpolar north.

Development of a Computerized Adaptive Testing Program for Alaska Natives Project

This project focuses on the development of a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) program as an alternative to conventional testing approaches for Alaska Natives (ANs).

Development of New Technique to Measure DNA Damage for NASA’s Applications

Current techniques to measure DNA damage and repair are limited to laboratory setting. In collaboration with Dr. Cheng-fu Chen (Engineering Department) we are developing new approach to measure DNA damage in the field settings.

Diet, Obesity, Inflammation and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Alaska Native People.

Our research project is the first to study the uncoupling of obesity and chronic inflammation in relation to Type II Diabetes.

Eagle-i Consortium

CANHR was a collaborator in the eagle-i Consortium, which collected resource information about animal models, reagents, tissue banks, core laboratories, human health study protocols and student research opportunities.

Elluam Tungiinun Egelruciq Ikayuulluta Agayutmek: Movement Towards Wellness Together with the Help of God/Creator

Elluam Tungiinun is a prevention trial to test the efficacy of the project’s culturally based approach to suicide and substance abuse prevention in three Yup'ik communities in southwest Alaska.

Ethics of Dissemination

In collaboration with investigators at the Center for Genomics and Healthcare Equality at the University of Washington, this interdisciplinary partnership will develop a culturally meaningful communications strategy for different types of genetic results.

Exploring how Alaska Native cultural values are interconnected with cancer

Cancer is currently the leading cause of death among Alaska Native people.

Fish-to-Schools: A Model to Enhance Health and Food Security in Alaska Native Communities

The health of Alaska Native people is inextricably tied to their traditional food system. Degradation of the food system over the past several decades due to changes in climate and socioeconomic pressures, however, has resulted in a shift in dietary patterns and contributed to growing health disparities.